Category Archives: Uncategorized

More on Ché Scoble…

Nicolas Carr has a good review on the Scoble vs. Facebook fight.

Rough Type: Nicholas Carr’s Blog: Scoble: freedom fighter or data thief?

If I remember correctly from my training, the data remains the information of the person that entered it. Also, the company storing the data, in this case Facebook, should not use it any way that hasn’t been agreed to by the originator of the data. If they do not protect the data they’re in breach of their data privacy rules.

If I’m right, it means that Scoble doesn’t have a leg to stand on and will loose his Facebook access for good.

I suppose the way to look at this is that Facebook’s terms of service are the way that Facebook applies data privacy law and ensures that it protects the data of the users that Scoble has linked to. Scoble isn’t alone, he’s got to think of the 5000 people he’s linked to; he needs permission from the 5000 to do this.

Facebook starts to putting users first or…

…maybe they’re just going to make money by charging to send users emails.

“Starting today, we’ll begin blocking links in Mini-Feed, Notifications, and Notification Emails which lead to the installation of another application in the hopes that developers focus on user experience and engagement being paramount, not deceiving users for the sake of growth.

Happy Hacking!”

Facebook Developers | Facebook Developers News

Effort over intelligence…

via Scientific American: The Secret to Raising Smart Kids

Proper Praise

How do we transmit a growth mind-set to our children? One way is by telling stories about achievements that result from hard work. For instance, talking about math geniuses who were more or less born that way puts students in a fixed mind-set, but descriptions of great mathematicians who fell in love with math and developed amazing skills engenders a growth mind-set, our studies have shown. People also communicate mind-sets through praise. Although many, if not most, parents believe that they should build up a child by telling him or her how brilliant and talented he or she is, our research suggests that this is misguided.In studies involving several hundred fifth graders published in 1998, for example, Columbia psychologist Claudia M. Mueller and I gave children questions from a nonverbal IQ test. After the first 10 problems, on which most children did fairly well, we praised them. We praised some of them for their intelligence: “Wow … that’s a really good score. You must be smart at this.” We commended others for their effort: “Wow … that’s a really good score. You must have worked really hard.”

We found that intelligence praise encouraged a fixed mind-set more often than did pats on the back for effort. Those congratulated for their intelligence, for example, shied away from a challenging assignment—they wanted an easy one instead—far more often than the kids applauded for their effort. (Most of those lauded for their hard work wanted the difficult problem set from which they would learn.) When we gave everyone hard problems anyway, those praised for being smart became discouraged, doubting their ability. And their scores, even on an easier problem set we gave them afterward, declined as compared with their previous results on equivalent problems. In contrast, students praised for their effort did not lose confidence when faced with the harder questions, and their performance improved markedly on the easier problems that followed.

LeWeb3 07 Looking Back

Jort is a collegue from Accenture in Amsterdam who I met for the first time at LeWeb3. I learnt a lot from sitting next to him for a couple of days. His notes are here…

Accenture BlogPodium /entrepreneurial-marketing/jortpossel/le-web-3-07-looking-back/

Of course, he’s missing the photo of himself…

Jort at LeWeb3

27% of Amazon Xmas Sales were Wiis!

If this is true it’s amazing. 27% of sales being the Wii. I suppose if you add iPods in that must be 80% of their business. Does that make all books “the long tail”?